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Virginia College Students in the Trial of Winning the Wind Competition

The state is preparing to send two groups to a national collegiate wind turbine competitors year after. If Virginia pursues its potential to be the wind power capital of the Southeast, growing homegrown expertise shall be essential.

So it’s a boon for the nascent trade that groups from two of the state’s outstanding universities have been invited to take part within the U.S. Department of Energy’s Collegiate Wind Competition in June 2020.

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and James Madison University and State University are amongst 12 colleges that may vie for high turbine rating in Denver next year.

Jon Miles, longtime director of the Center for Wind Energy at James Madison, is happy to be sending students to the separate occasion for the third time because it debuted in 2014.

The competition is modeled after the Solar Decathlon, a formidable Department of Energy enterprise launched in 2002 to encourage ingenuity within the area of renewables amongst faculty students.

Students are scored on five parts, which embrace designing and fabricating a wind turbine and growing a wind farm siting plan. The situation of the each-different-year competitors rotates in tandem with the American Wind Energy Association’s annual convention.

Matt Kuester, an assistant analysis professor, is the adviser for an up-and-coming Virginia Tech wind crew that was first chosen to compete last year when the occasion was in Chicago. His experience is in wind turbine aerodynamics and aeroacoustics.

When he got here to the Blacksburg, Virginia, college five years in the past with a doctorate diploma from Texas A&M University, he noticed significant potential with a campus wind tunnel that Virginia Tech had bought from NASA within the 1950s. It had been modified over a long time and some other years in the past grew to become a go-to blade-testing site for wind turbine producers in America and Europe.