E-vehicle Energy

Federal Government slammed following claims of misinformation and modeling in EVs to support its policies

Summary

A recent report has slammed the federal government with claims that it delivered misleading information on EVs to boost its policies. The report claims that the government misled the people stating that PEVs (Petrol-electric hybrids) are more outstanding options for […]

A recent report has slammed the federal government with claims that it delivered misleading information on EVs to boost its policies. The report claims that the government misled the people stating that PEVs (Petrol-electric hybrids) are more outstanding options for cutting harmful gas emissions than all-electric cars. The Australian Institute says that the federal government came up with questionable models to boost its position in the Future Fuels Strategy paper in the February 2021 draft by claiming that all-electric cars were a waste of money.

The Australia Institute stated that the government misled the people to justify why they don’t have EV subsidies and incentives. The Future Fuels Strategy paper relies on details saying that EV incentives are a poor value for money. However, these details are not factual hence misleading to the people. This report also says that a leaked copy of the December 2020 discussion paper didn’t have the modeling initially but was added later with claims that it serves as an illustrative copy. Therefore, these details prove that the modeling came to be to back up policies regarding electric cars.

The institute gave facts on the issue, such as abatement costs are not accounted for when utilizing like-to-like car models and will not show facts about the maintenance and fuel savings of an all-electric car. Besides, the emissions comparisons are estimated over half a decade instead of a decade, which is the average lifetime of any vehicle and doesn’t account for the rooftop solar charging feature, resulting in a poor profile regarding EV emissions.

Australian Institute went ahead to point out many faults in the government, stating that the 2020 Emissions report contradicts the Future Fuel Strategy paper, leaving many in question why the same government can publish different reports. The discussion paper doesn’t prioritize EV incentives; instead, it pays attention to enabling consumer options, promoting industry growth, and reducing emissions in the transport industry. However, the Australia Institute alleges that these statements are impossible to achieve since the country misses the decarbonization strategies, no reliable CO2 emissions report, and no incentives to encourage people to invest in electric cars.

The government, via Angus Taylor, a spokesperson under the Energy ministry and Emissions reduction, rejects these allegations. Taylor explained that analysis from a reliable team shows that BEV incentives are not a value-for-money move for the people. Industry bodies may have supported the discussion paper, but privately-owned carmakers have criticized the policies.

The Future Fuel Strategy paper consultation period ended on April 2nd. The government is planning to take the necessary measures and consider the proposals leading to the finalization of this discussion paper.